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The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World by Eric Weiner. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Part travel memoir, part humor, and part twisted self-help guide, The Geography of Bliss takes the reader across the globe to investigate not what happiness is. The Geography of Bliss. by Eric Weiner DOWNLOAD OPTIONS. download 1 file Borrow this book to access EPUB and PDF files.


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Просмотр темы1. DOWNLOAD The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World By Eric Weiner [PDF EBOOK EPUB KINDLE]. download or read book online in pdf or epub. Download The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Starred Review. Fortified with Eeyoreish Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

This basically is what this book tries to answer. It does not offer solution to unhappiness. As the author Eric Weiner puts it, he only hopes his reader to have something to "chew on".

Boy, Weiner offers a lot of stuff that his readers could chew and afterwards either swallow or spit out. They are so many that I did not know which to one to pick, remember or forget. The reason why they are so many is that Eric Weiner, an American, is a foreign correspondent for Nationa What makes people happy?

The reason why they are so many is that Eric Weiner, an American, is a foreign correspondent for National Public Radio and has been assigned to more than 30 countries What a job! So, he knows what he talks about. In this book, he goes to the happiest countries in the world, i. He also incorporated insights from: India, where happiness and misery live side-by-side; Great Britain, where happiness is in the making and USA for he has to talk about his own country. I bought this book thinking that Philippines was included.

Most of the Filipinos I know are proud to have our country always rank high in happiest country in the world survey.

Anything positive about our country in the world's eyes is something that we are always or should be proud of. After finishing pages of this book, however, the only mention about Filipinos are those baristas in Qatar with no indication whether they were happy while grinding coffee or not at least, nothing negative! Weiner, however, included Thailand and India whose concepts of happiness, in my opinion, are similar to us Filipinos'. For example, in Thailand, like in the Philippines, we take things lightly.

We may get a slap, curse or a frown. But at the end of the day, we are still friends. Jokes make things light in the office" says the Thai in Weiner's interview.

So, what makes people happy? Is it money? Does culture have anything to do with it? Does living in a tropical country or a house by a beach make its people happy?

Does a well-run government have an effect on its citizenry's happiness? Are religious countries more happy than others? For me, happiness is a state of mind and it is a confluence of personal emotions.

It is so complex to understand that I tend to agree with the Indian in the book who says that "the more you think about happiness, the more unhappy you get. Happiness should not be taken seriously" Most of my family members and friends here in the Philippines, would probably say that money means happiness.

This is what Weiner says about it: Neither is gratitude. That's why I drop down my book whenever my wife or daughter talks to me ignoring that I am engrossed with what I am reading. That's why I take time off just to make friends here in Goodreads. I don't envy people getting more "likes" in their book reviews Envy is toxic ha ha! That's why I am happy! Well, most of the time. I absolutely loved this book. Not only is Weiner brutally honest and laugh-out-loud funny because of it , he is a great storyteller but never, ever tells you what to think.

There were times that I questioned my own beliefs and wanted to have a bigger conversation. This is a good read for anyone. Highly recommend! A few words of wisdom gleaned from the pages: Maybe it is simply easie I absolutely loved this book.

The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner (ebook)

Maybe it is simply easier to 'be' and therefore 'be happy. I'm not saying they were all good or that they happened for a reason - I don't buy that - but they have been right. They have been Okay is not bliss, or even happiness.

Okay is not the basis for a new religion or self-help movement. But okay is a start, and for that I am grateful. During life's difficult patches, camaraderie blunts our misery; during the good times, it boosts our happiness. Not with a thunderclap or a bolt of lightning but as a steady drip, drip, drip until one day you realize your bucket is full.

I am no philosopher, so here goes: Money matters, but less than we think and not in the way we think. View all 3 comments. Jan 29, Cheryl rated it liked it.

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Thanks GR for reminding me about this. I don't remember much, but I do remember it was interesting. ETA - ironically, I do remember even now some general principles that Bliss discusses that I wish more people understood and implied. Some of the ideas keep coming up in many of the psych books I've been reading since. For example, 'the paradox of choice' principle - we get frustrated if there's more stuff out there than we can use, because of the feeling that we must be missing out on somethi Thanks GR for reminding me about this.

For example, 'the paradox of choice' principle - we get frustrated if there's more stuff out there than we can use, because of the feeling that we must be missing out on something even better. I should maybe reread this now that I have read so many other related science and popular science books. Feb 11, Helynne rated it really liked it. I loved American journalist Eric Weiner's dry humor as he describes his recent romp around the world researching different societies and their philosophies on happiness.

During his travels to the Netherlands, Switzerland, Bhutan, Quatar Persian Gulf , Iceland, Moldova, Thailand, India, Great Britain and finally back to the USA, he learns so much about various ethnic groups and what is and is not important to their overall contentment.

My favorite chapter happened to be the visit to Iceland whe I loved American journalist Eric Weiner's dry humor as he describes his recent romp around the world researching different societies and their philosophies on happiness. My favorite chapter happened to be the visit to Iceland where, despite the months of neverending darkness, the people are upbeat and creative, great contributors to their culture in terms of writing and music, and fiercely proud of their language "the pure speech of the Vikings" and identity.

In short, there is a correlation between creativity and happiness. The most downbeat chapter is the discussion of Moldova, a poor country between Romania and the Ukraine, which has virtually no culture, no optimism, and no desire to reach out to make other people's lives better. The one thread that runs through this psychological study is that there is a definite link between altruism and happiness.

He also states that "People engaged in the highest altruistic professions--nurses, clergy, physical therapists, and firemen report the greatest happiness Seventy percent of our happiness rests on our relationships with other people" He also notes that materialistic people are not as happy as non-materialistic people. As for us Americans, we have more money today than Americans ever have had, yet we are not as happy.

The self-help movement actually makes this worse "by telling us that happiness lives inside of us just when we should be looking outward; not to money, but to other people, to commmunity and to the human bonds that so clearly are the sources of happiness" Lots to be learned here from a cultural and psychological point of view!

Jan 22, Chrissie rated it really liked it Shelves: This book makes an attempt to figure out what makes people happy and if perhaps some countries are more conductive to happiness than others. Can happiness be equated with living in a democratic, safe societies? How does money, power, family and friends, religion, trust, homogeneous versus heterogeneous cultural surroundings influence happiness.

Some of the conclusions are not as straightforward as one would think. To what extent are people influenced differently? What seems to works in Thailand This book makes an attempt to figure out what makes people happy and if perhaps some countries are more conductive to happiness than others. What seems to works in Thailand or in Iceland, will it work for me?! Did it work for the author?

The book offers lots to think about, but of course no definite answers, although I was not looking for that anyway! Furthermore it was amusingly written - you laugh a lot! It is also interesting to learn more about the cultures of the countries discussed - this being one of the prime reasons I chose to read the book.

It was a very good book, but too get the most out of this book I think it is best to discuss it with others. I don't think I could convert to Buddhism, but perhaps I can change how I look at things a teeny bit!

Mar 23, Julie Reynolds rated it really liked it. I wanted to read this book not to find the happiest place on Earth but to try and improve my abysmal grasp of world geography. I ended up learning something about both the world and happiness. I even underlined things. The grouchy, world-weary Eric Weiner is clearly searching for his own bliss and this is sometimes tiresome, but often very funny and occasionally inspirational hence the underlining. Spoiler alert: Jul 25, Larry H rated it really liked it.

I don't know what appealed to me most about this book--the concept of a traveler scouring the globe for the happiest places in the world, or the fact that the author is a self-labeled "grump. Eric Weiner thoroughly investigates what makes people happy in a number of different countries, from the Netherlands and Switzerland to Bhutan and Thailand, and even stops in a "miserable" country along the way.

I learned mo I don't know what appealed to me most about this book--the concept of a traveler scouring the globe for the happiest places in the world, or the fact that the author is a self-labeled "grump. I learned more about people, culture and history of these countries than I ever imagined I would, and ultimately, this book really made me think. If you're a traveler or have ever wondered what makes people tick, you'll really want to read this book! Banyaknya halaman yang saya lipat menandakan betapa saya menikmati membaca buku ini.

Sudah pula berniat membuat review yang serius. Tapi setelah selesai saya malah kebingungan untuk mereviewnya. Buku ini memang lebih enak dibaca daripada dianalisis alasan! Yang jelas, ini buku perjalanan dengan angle yang tidak biasa: Ditulis oleh seorang penggerutu yang mengutip Eric Hoffer bahwa Pencarian kebahagiaan adalah salah satu sumber utama ketidakbahagiaan dan m Banyaknya halaman yang saya lipat menandakan betapa saya menikmati membaca buku ini.

Ditulis oleh seorang penggerutu yang mengutip Eric Hoffer bahwa Pencarian kebahagiaan adalah salah satu sumber utama ketidakbahagiaan dan menanggapinya dengan Tidak apa-apa.

Saya sudah tidak bahagia. Saya tidak rugi apa-apa hal. Fakta-fakta yang dia beberkan memang ada yang menggelikan, mengejutkan, menohok, bahkan menghina. Walaupun banyak yang bagus juga, tentu saja. Alhasil, membaca buku ini kembali menyadarkan saya bahwa manusia di berbagai belahan dunia sungguh unik dengan cara mereka masing-masing. Menghargai perbedaan dan tidak merasa benar sendiri menjadi jalan terindah untuk bisa memahami adat dan budaya orang lain.

Karena sesuatu yang dianggap baik di suatu tempat belum tentu dianggap baik di tempat lain. Itu sebabnya manusia dianugerahi naluri untuk membuka mata dan menjelajahi tempat-tempat baru, agar tidak menjadi picik dan menganggap dunia hanya selebar daun kelor.

Akhirnya saya memutuskan untuk memajang beberapa banyak!

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Segala sesuatu diatur di Swiss. Sekali setahun, pada Hari Buruh, para anarkis memecah beberapa kaca etalase, tetapi selalu tepat pada jam yang sama. Di Swiss, menyiram toilet setelah jam 10 malam atau memotong rumput pada hari Minggu ilegal, tapi bunuh diri sangat legal. Suatu ketika, orang Swiss benar-benar memberikan suara mereka untuk meningkatkan pajak mereka sendiri.

Di Bhutan, apa yang ada di dalam sering lebih mengesankan daripada apa yang ada di luar. Dalam masyarakat industri yang makmur, kita dihalangi melakukan apa pun yang tidak produktif.

Sebaliknya, warga Bhutan akan dengan senang hati menghabiskan hari dengan bermain dart atau tidak melakukan apa pun. Anda mengetahui banyak hal tentang suatu negara dari cara rakyatnya mengemudi. Deplu Amerika Serikat memberikan peringatan tentang mengemudi di Qatar, yang mereka gambarkan sebagai 'olahraga ekstrem'.

Generasi anak-anak Qatar dibesarkan oleh para pengasuh anak yang tidak berbicara dalam bahasa mereka dan yang tidak memiliki wewenang untuk mendisiplinkan mereka.

Orang Islandia memuja para penulis mereka. Penulis di Islandia bahkan digaji oleh pemerintah. Kota itu tahu tempatnya di alam semesta, tahu bahwa dirinya adalah tempat tak penting, dan nyaman dengan keadaan itu.

One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World

Pengungsi hedonis adalah mereka yang pindah ke tempat baru, budaya baru, karena lebih bahagia di sana. Bagi orang Swiss, demokrasi ibarat lapisan gula di atas kue mereka. Orang Moldova tidak bisa menikmati lapisan gula karena mereka tidak punya kue. Mengapa orang Thailand kelihatan begitu bahagia?

Apa pun itu, kami bisa menerimanya. Menjadi terlalu Amerika atau seperti orang Amerika adalah hal terburuk bagi orang Inggris. Di Inggris, mengetahui nama seseorang bukanlah formalitas. Itu sebuah prestasi. Banyak orang India yang sudah tinggal di luar negeri tapi selalu kembali.

Demi India, McDonald's untuk pertama kalinya menghapus Big Mac dari seluruh menu hamburgernya, karena umat Hindu tidak makan daging sapi. Kita tidak mencintai suatu tempat atau seseorang jika satu kaki kita selalu berada di luar pintu. Apakah Weiner akhirnya menemukan tempat yang paling bisa membuatnya bahagia?

Mengutip John Howell, "Ada banyak jalan menuju bahagia", maka kebahagiaan sebenarnya kembali kepada diri kita sendiri.

Toh berdasarkan salah satu survei kebahagiaan lain http: Di mana pun kita berada, kita bisa dan berhak untuk bahagia, tak peduli apa kata semua survei dan riset di luar sana.

Jan 21, Hilda rated it really liked it Recommended to Hilda by: In the book Weiner, an NPR correspondent, travels across the world to understand why people are happy or unhappy. In the process he ponders on his own happiness or lack thereof.

You will do the same when you read it. Far from a dry, scholarly sociology study, the book is totally readable and at times very, very funny. In addition to the "happiness studies" we learn a little history and a lot of culture about the various countries. We also get to know some of the people Weiner meets as he investigates his topic, and in some cases you start to care about them. The happiest countries may not be the ones you expect and the reasons for their happiness may also come as a surprise.

This is one of those books that I highlighted and wrote on the margins - there's a lot of good information and common-sense wisdom. I definitely recommend the book. Jul 12, Sarah Sammis rated it it was ok Shelves: Inspired by research done in the Netherlands on the World Database of Happiness page 7 , NPR correspondent and self proclaimed grump Eric Weiner decided to travel to the happiest countries in the world to see if he could figure out the secret of happiness.

Like so many recent travelogues the book quickly stops being about the research and Inspired by research done in the Netherlands on the World Database of Happiness page 7 , NPR correspondent and self proclaimed grump Eric Weiner decided to travel to the happiest countries in the world to see if he could figure out the secret of happiness. Like so many recent travelogues the book quickly stops being about the research and becomes a blow by blow account of the journey.

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When Weiner pulls himself out of the picture and focuses on the culture of the place he's visiting the book is fascinating. Unfortunately, as he becomes more jet lagged he spends more of his time grousing. The first hundred pages or so are interesting. I especially liked the chapter set in Bhutan and how it contrasted to Qatar. By Iceland, things started to wind down an his observations on human nature began getting repetitive. Apr 28, Turi rated it liked it Shelves: The Geography of Bliss wasn't quite what I expected.

I picked it up because one of the blurbs on the back compared it favorably to Bill Bryson's writing, and I was in a mood to laugh. Didn't make me laugh more than a few chuckles, but it did make me think. Eric Weiner travels around the world, exploring the concept of "happy places," places where the inhabitants are considered "happy. He talks to happiness "experts" and looks at concepts like Bhutan's policy of Gross National Happiness.

And he does some soul searching to find what kind of place makes him happy. Overall, this was thought provoking and really readable. I'd recommend it to a friend who reads nonfiction, if I had any Dec 10, Shawnie rated it really liked it Shelves: This travel memoir had me laughing. It was interesting hearing how different cultures in the world define and seek happiness.

May 08, Jerzy rated it really liked it Shelves: Definitely entertaining, with Bill-Bryson-like self-deprecating and observational humor, and it contains several good insights. My home country's doing much better than Moldova now, but it was in a similar situation for a time -- and the author really milks the cheap humor out of that kind of depressing situation, with very little positive to say, which is a shame.

On the other hand, it was fascinating to read about li Definitely entertaining, with Bill-Bryson-like self-deprecating and observational humor, and it contains several good insights.

The Geography of Bliss

On the other hand, it was fascinating to read about life in less-familiar places Bhutan especially his talks with Karma Ura or Qatar or Iceland, even if those chapters are probably just as superficial as the one on Moldova.

We want to achieve our happiness and not just experience it. Maybe happiness is this: I have achieved happiness because I don't have unrealistic expectations.

You need to think about death for five minutes every day. It will cure you, sanitize you. We don't believe in this Robinson Crusoe happiness. All happiness is relational. You need enough money to have your dignity. Beyond that, it won't make you happy.

When Ambition is your God, the office is your temple, the employee handbook your holy book. The sacred drink, coffee, is imbibed five times a day. When you worship Ambition, there is no Sabbath, no day of rest. Every day, you rise early and kneel before the God Ambition, facing in the direction of your PC. It has no heft or style. It doesn't say anything about me. It's just a pen.

I don't ask anything more of it, and that, I suspect, is why we get along so well. Necessity may be the mother of invention, but interdependence is the mother of affection. Old ladies can wind their long hair in this language And can hum, and knit, and make pancakes. But you cannot have a cocktail party in this language And say witty things standing up with a drink in your hand.

You must sit down to speak this language, It is so heavy you can't be polite or chatter in it. For once you have begun a sentence, the whole course of your life is laid out before you. Yes, failure doesn't carry a stigma in Iceland. In fact, in a way, we admire failures. We like people who fail if they fail with the best intentions. Maybe they failed because they weren't ruthless enough, for instance.

In Iceland, Larus tells me, being naive is okay because you can always start over. The measure of a society, [Nietzsche] said, is how well it transforms pain and suffering into something worthwhile. Happiness is your state of mind and the way you pursue that state of mind. The quality of a society is more important than your place in that society. We in the west think of unpredictability as a menace, something to be avoided at all costs. We want our careers, our family lives, our roads, our weather to be utterly predictable.

We love nothing more than a sure thing. But here is a group of rational software engineers telling me that they like unpredictability, crave it, can't live without it.

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Why do we lose our temper? Because we love perfection. Create a little room for imperfection in your life. Desire is the root cause of sorrow but desire is also the root cause of action. How do we counter the paralysis of action when there is no desire to motivate us? Our attitude is, 'Okay, you've done your best, now let the universe decide.

What some people call chance, we call God. But let's call it unpredictability. You do the same thing ten times, and it doesn't work. On the eleventh time, it works. The entire universe is chance and probability.

So we accept everything. It is home "for now," she says. And that, I realize, is the problem with hedonic floaters like Cynthia and with many of us Americans and our perpetual pursuit of happiness. We may be fairly happy now, but there's always tomorrow and the prospect of a happier place, a happier life.

So all options are left on the table. We never fully commit. That is, I think, a dangerous thing. We can't love a place, or a person, if we always have one foot out the door.

Laurey calls it the golden thread. A path appears, faint at first, but increasingly clear if you're willing to look closely.

There is one simple question, he said, the answer to which identifies your true home. That question is: The Geography of Bliss by Eric weiner 3 stars 3 10 Oct 30, Who's Happy? Readers Also Enjoyed. About Eric Weiner. Eric Weiner. A number of high schools and universities have incorporated the book into their curricula. Eric writes a regular column for BBC Travel. He is a popular speaker and lecturer. When not writing, or thinking about writing, Eric is an avid cyclist and consumer of sushi Tekka maki, in particular.

He lives in in the Washington, DC area, with his wife and daughter and their two rambunctious cats. Books by Eric Weiner. Trivia About The Geography of Quotes from The Geography of It isolates us from other people. It enables us to build walls, literal and figurative, around ourselves. We move from a teeming college dorm to an apartment to a house, and if we're really wealthy, to an estate.

We think we're moving up, but really we're walling off ourselves. But the question remains: What makes people happy? Is it the freedom of the West or the myriad restrictions of Singapore? The simple ashrams of India or the glittering shopping malls of Qatar? From the youthful drunkenness of Iceland to the despond of Slough, a sad but resilient town in Heathrow's flight path, Weiner offers wry yet profound observations about the way people relate to circumstance and fate.

Both revealing and inspirational, perhaps the best thing about this hilarious trip across four continents is that for the reader, the "geography of bliss" is wherever they happen to find themselves while reading it.. So, after finishing reading this book, i recommend to readers to not underestimate this great book. More details about this book: Eric Weiner Rating: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World Book by Eric Weiner Because reading books was my hobby and as my gratitude and pride, in this review i would give you trusted link to get all access to read online or download The Geography of Bliss: I read The Geography of Bliss: