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Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub Death by Black Hole? explores a myriad of cosmic topics, from what it would be like to be Download. 5MzB7Ju - Read and download Neil deGrasse Tyson's book Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries in PDF, EPub, Mobi. Death'by'Black'Hole:'And'Other'Cosmic'Quandaries'ebook'download'epub'pdf' audiobook. Lerlyen; 5 videos; No views; Updated today. Play all. Share. Loading .

Loyal readers of the monthly "Universe" essays in Natural History magazine have long recognized Neil deGrasse Tyson's talent for guiding them through the mysteries of the cosmos with clarity and enthusiasm. Bringing together more than forty of Tyson's favorite essays,? Death by Black Hole? One of America's best-known astrophysicists, Tyson is a natural teacher who simplifies the complexities of astrophysics while sharing his infectious fascination for our universe. Physics Instant Egghead Guides.

I'd love to meet this guy one day. Him, Bill Nye, Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking sparked my love of science in my high school years, and it became an obsession in my adulthood. Thanks, guys. Neil Degrasse Tyson is one of those science guys that you wished you had as a teacher, he's excited and impassioned by his subject and it shows on every page.

Mostly known as the host of PBS's Nova Science Now, he never talks over your head, but at the same time, Tyson always assumes that you're intelligent and can grasp the concepts he's discussing.

It's a fine balance that many science writers fail to master. Anyone who is interested in Astronomy should give this book a try. It covers a lot of Neil Degrasse Tyson is one of those science guys that you wished you had as a teacher, he's excited and impassioned by his subject and it shows on every page. It covers a lot of ground and is ultimately a very rewarding read.

There isn't anything particularly advanced in this book, though as it is a collection of essays, perhaps that is expected. It's easy to get into as a result, and Tyson has a good style that stays entertaining while being informative. A great title for a book, that alone made me want to read it. Of course, this is the type of book I will almost always pick up from the library. It is a collection of essays on science for the magazine Natural History.

It covers a wide range of topics, usually relating to physics, from particle physics to astrophysics. I love this stuff and I only wish I retained enough math to be able to read more technical discussions than these rather general essays.

Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

The essays are informative and entertaining A great title for a book, that alone made me want to read it. The essays are informative and entertaining. A lot has changed in the 17 years since I took my particle physics class at BYU, so I am always interested to learn more. Not only does he describe what is happening in science, he describes the edges very well. By edges I mean the places where scientists are not sure what is happening and are actively searching for answers.

That is always the most interesting part of any science. The problem today is that to get to that edge, you have to take years of schooling to understand what they are looking for. Once the edge could be explored in your home lab or a field if you were Benjamin Franklin now you need millions of dollars and a space telescope.

The book is a bit repetitive, though that often happens with collections of essays because each one had to be self contained and couldn't refer to last month's issue. There has been a bit of editing to smooth out the sequencing and to make it an easier read. While I enjoyed all the essays, I took exception to the last one, entitled, The Perimeter of Ignorance. Here is the author's basic premise, Writing in centuries past, many scientists felt compelled to wax poetic about cosmic mysteries and God's handiwork.

Perhaps one should not be surprised at this: But a careful reading of older texts, particularly those concerned with the universe itself, shows that the authors invoke divinity only when they reach the boundaries of their understanding.

They appeal to a higher power only when staring at the ocean of their own ignorance. They call on God only from the lonely and precarious edge of incomprehension.

Where they feel certain about their explanations, however, God hardly gets a mention.

He goes on from this hypothesis to give some quotes from Newton and other scientists, who do indeed see an explanation for the unexplainable in the presence of God. He then links this tendency to the current vogue for intelligent design.

That also follows, more or less. I have my own issues with intelligent design, at least how it is being explained and used in the public sphere, but I won't go into all that here.

The problem I have is that the author considers an appeal to deity as an admission of failure and the mental equivalent of throwing up your hands and saying, "Heck if I know, only God could figure that out, I will just go find something easier to study, like Paris Hilton.

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Since when is saying something is divinely designed the same as saying we are not capable of understanding it? As a devout person, but one who would have been a scientist, if not for a few chance decisions and a problem with basic arithmetic, I find everything divinely inspired, even those things we do understand.

Too many people equate religion with ignorance, without considering the fact that the intelligent people who believe, must have a valid reason for doing so. And similarly, there are many ignorant people who have no religion. Believing in ignorance is just superstition whatever belief it may be. The more you understand your own beliefs, the more you want to learn.

Our brains are designed to increase in knowledge, anything that does that helps all of us, no matter what the information may be. An astrophysicist for the American Museum of Natural History, director of the world famous Hayden Planetarium, and columnist for Natural History magazine, Neil DeGrasse Tyson brings to the non-scientific world the ideal book for those fascinated with space, the cosmos, black holes, and all the questions and wonders therein.

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The book is a selection of his columns in Natural History that are organized in a somewhat textbook fashion. Tyson starts with the idea of science and nature in its basic form, how humanity views Earth, the solar system, the universe. Along with this discussion, Tyson also gives minor history lessons on the development of different ideas in physics and astronomy, what people came up with what big ideas and how the progression led to the development of the big theories of our current time with string theory and relativity.

Going on from here, Death by Black Hole address the crucial steps that led to the formation of the universe and its development over the many billions and billions of years, again explaining how it is that scientists know what they do and what instruments were used, as well as the history of who invented and used said instruments.

Tyson takes the reader on a hypothetical journey with what would happen if one were to be sucked into a black hole and how as they approached the event horizon, they would become stretched until the elasticity point of their skin was surpassed and the body would be torn into thousands then millions of little pieces.

With many questions now answered, in the next section Tyson discusses how science is viewed by the media, Hollywood, and people around the world in general. The final section addresses the concept of science and religion, again taking the reader on a historic journey through the development of first religion, then science, and the struggle that has ensued for centuries.

It is the perfect end to a book on science, as Tyson lectures the importance of supporting fact and reality in a time when there are many who believe more in faith, even when all the evidence is to the contrary. For more book reviews, and author interviews, go to BookBanter. Mar 20, Negativni rated it it was amazing.

Ima i dio o odnosu znanosti i religije. How about drowning, the fifth leading cause? Zatim je tu, naravno, i opis kako bi izgledala smrt upadanjem u crnu rupu s nogama naprijed.

Jul 18, Jose Moa rated it really liked it Shelves: A sort of a Nearly a Histhory of Everything but foccused mainly on astrophysics,writen as a series of articles touching diverse subjects. A very entertaining,easy to read popular science book with, unusual in this sort of books, a touch of fine and at times acid humor.

It has two very interesting final chapters where the author makes a disgression of the relations between people,science and religion,and makes clear his position in regard to the inteligent design hypotesis with yhe following textua A sort of a Nearly a Histhory of Everything but foccused mainly on astrophysics,writen as a series of articles touching diverse subjects.

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It has two very interesting final chapters where the author makes a disgression of the relations between people,science and religion,and makes clear his position in regard to the inteligent design hypotesis with yhe following textual phrase: Inteligent design is a philosophy of ignorance. A interesting,entertaining and easy summer read Well written and great stuff for the universe geek or anyone with the slightest interest and curiosity for learning.

NDT adds some fun with his quirks and humor. Allow me to indulge in a little pun here- And it ends with a bang. View all 3 comments.

My main dissatisfaction with this book is that it's a series of collected magazine columns. This does seem a bit like criticising an apple because it's not a banana, however I think Tyson would have be been better advised to hire an editor to whip this into an actual book, rather than just reprint the original short essays.

For example, in chapter 25 Tyson critiques the concept of the "Goldilocks Zone" , discussing the myriad ways life could flourish in environments entirely dissimilar to our own My main dissatisfaction with this book is that it's a series of collected magazine columns. For example, in chapter 25 Tyson critiques the concept of the "Goldilocks Zone" , discussing the myriad ways life could flourish in environments entirely dissimilar to our own e.

But then in the following chapter Tyson contends that life will only originate on a planet with a temperature that allows liquid water i. Originally these essays would have been published months or years apart, but juxtaposed like this it is a frustrating read, to say the least. The other problem with short essays is that things just start to get interesting and it's over.

Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries - Bookdl

In chapter 21 Tyson briefly mentions technetium; an element with a half-life of only 2 million years, but which is nevertheless found in red giant stars. There is also no known mechanism to create technetium in a star's core and have it dredge itself up to the surface where it is observed, which has led to exotic theories that have yet to achieve consensus in the astrophysics community" But you know, those diverse and exotic theories are exactly what I'd like to hear about!

That was the most interesting part of the book for me, and it just gets left lying gasping on the floor. Also, sadly, the book is aimed at someone who has done little or no prior science reading; a far broader generalist audience that I hoped for.

If you don't generally read pop-science, but would like to learn more about how our universe works, I definitely recommend this book. Tyson is a great writer: For me it's a 2. I can already see the masses of Tyson fans charging ahead just to light me aflame for having the audicity to doubt a word he says, but so I must. To be fair, I love Neil deGrasse Tyson. I saw him speak at USC, I've watched his lectures and his interviews, and I think he has done more for popularizing science than anyone else.

But none of that a writer makes. This is especially true of sarcastic and sardonic wit. Being funny in text is what I would rate as the most challenging things to accomplis I can already see the masses of Tyson fans charging ahead just to light me aflame for having the audicity to doubt a word he says, but so I must. Being funny in text is what I would rate as the most challenging things to accomplish some comics may agree because it loses so much of the presence, tone, and body language that makes something funny.

Tyson is a legitimately funny person, I promise this, but aside from the knowledge that he wrote this, none of that translates well.

I could guess that this is because much of his humor is in his intonations, pauses, and timing, something any classclown can tell you about. But not any classclown can write a best-selling comedic novel, nor can just any astro-physicist write a truly comic novel, or at least one which transfers that genius. What I'm getting at is that this book is dry. It seeks to inform, but it does so in a way that is just a little bit uninteresting and just a little bit reminscent of my astronomy courses.

Interesting stuff, but the delivery was just all wrong. This wasn't assisted by the fact that the structuring of the book is terrible. To be fair, Tyson admits at the outset that this is little more than a collection of essays slapped back to back and tidied up a bit to try and make them fit, but that is exactly how they read. The transitions are generally poor and always jarring.

The sentences don't blend together so much as float like an oily film, and trying to read too many consectutive pieces put together makes me feel as if my brain were a poorly done game of tetris - too many holes and not enough matching lines. But hey, I'm for anything that gets people reading, and I'm especially for anything that gets people reading about the world and about science.

It goes without saying that I'm far happier this book is out there and so widely read than never having been published. I just prattle on because I'm a snot-nose with too many standards. Death by Black Hole is one of the most interesting non-fiction science books I've ever read. This isn't a book about farfetched scenarios as its title implies - only a single chapter was actually about "death by black hole" - but the rest of the book presented a thorough and highly scientific explanation of the universe as we know Death by Black Hole is one of the most interesting non-fiction science books I've ever read.

This isn't a book about farfetched scenarios as its title implies - only a single chapter was actually about "death by black hole" - but the rest of the book presented a thorough and highly scientific explanation of the universe as we know it. Being that this book wasn't written as one cohesive text it's a summary of essays as I mentioned , there is some informational overlap between the chapters.

You'll be introduced to people like Galileo, Keppler, and Huygens more than once. I didn't mind at all, and I thought the overlap helped me solidify information. My favorite part of this book the crazy facts about celestial scale it presented. For example, the book states that a photon of light takes something like seconds to go from the Sun's surface to the surface of earth; conversely, that same photon took upwards of , years to go from the Sun's core to the Sun's surface.

Read the book and you'll learn why: I feel that the reason that people do not understand science in the US today is because we have a foolish tradition of thinking that the only way to "know" physics is through the terse formalism of mathematics. Math is a tool to do science, as much as a microscope or a superconducting supercollider. The disservice we do as scientists are when we are unable to communicate the concepts about our physical world to the population at large because we tangle ourselves up in mathematical formalism.

Neil I feel that the reason that people do not understand science in the US today is because we have a foolish tradition of thinking that the only way to "know" physics is through the terse formalism of mathematics.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson will never have that criticism hurled against him. It is in the tradition of Sagan, Gribbin and Hawking that Tyson writes and his essays are pure delight, discussing the concepts of physics as though he was having a casual coffee talk. It makes science fun. Yes your brain will come alive, but for a basic understanding of our physical world, this book should be read and I can't wait to read another by him. I even learned that laser spectroscopists and chemists label the same energy transitions differently.

Sep 26, Dale Jr. Neil deGrasse Tyson has become a bit of an inspiration and scientific hero to me. He's a man who strongly pushes forth to erase scientific ignorance and champions the exploration of our world and the universe to further human greatness. His lectures are intensely interesting and full of scientific knowledge, yet easy to follow by anyone willing to listen and apply their minds. He boils down some of the most complex theories and scientific facts so that they're easily understood.

His writing is no Neil deGrasse Tyson has become a bit of an inspiration and scientific hero to me. His writing is no different. I've been diving further and further into astrophysics and varying theories in related fields string and multiverse theory is, simply put, awesome. This journey has made me quite familiar with Tyson and I figured it was about time to pick up one of his texts.

Death by Black Hole is a collection of essays and lectures spanning the entire field of astrophysics and cosmology. From the Big Bang, to the life cycles of stars. From the speed of light to the mind-boggling power of black holes.

There's even a section where Tyson describes the three biggest ways our world will come to an end. And it has nothing to do with ancient Mayan prophecy or the second coming. When scientifically investigating the natural world the only thing worse than a blind believer is a seeing denier.

Since it is a collection of various lectures and essays, some information is repeated here and there, but it does not detract from the wealth of knowledge contained between the covers. I learned a lot. Retained most of it in one reading due to Tyson's way of writing and explaining. This is a book full of information, yet you never feel like your reading something as dry as a text book. Tyson makes you want to keep reading. He injects humor along with serious scientific education.

I'm glad that his book lived up to my expectations of him and I will be sure to pick up his others. Quite frankly, this was the best non-fiction book I've read this year. Wonderfully executed and easily devoured. I feel both filled with new knowledge, and humbled by the amount I, and the rest of my human brothers and sisters, do not know yet.

Death by Black Hole

But as Tyson lays out in his book, it's not wrong to be ignorant of something as long as you are continuing to try and figure it out. Science is a philosophy of discovery. Intelligent design is a philosophy of ignorance. You cannot build a program of discovery on the assumption that nobody is smart enough to figure out the answer to the problem. Once upon a time, people identified the god Neptune as the source of storms at sea.

Today we call these storms hurricanes. We know when and where they start. We know what drives them. We know what mitigates their destructive power.

And anyone who has studied global warming can tell you what makes them worse. The only people who still call hurricanes "acts of God" are the people who write insurance forms. If the lovely fact that our sun will probably burn out in 4 billion years and our beloved Earth will turn into a huge ball of black rock because of it until it's vaporized that is bothers you, keeps you up in the night, this book might not be for you.

If you're worried about an asteroid hitting somewhere between Hawaii and California in and Idaho becoming ocean front property hmm, maybe an improvement?

If you're worried about what might happen to yo If the lovely fact that our sun will probably burn out in 4 billion years and our beloved Earth will turn into a huge ball of black rock because of it until it's vaporized that is bothers you, keeps you up in the night, this book might not be for you. If you're worried about what might happen to you if you inadvertently get a little, tinsy bit too close to a black hole of death! Because, if you thought your ulcer was healing and you could eat salsa with your chips again.

Think again! A collection of essays about a myriad of cosmic topics from Natural History magazine written by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson you've probably seen him on PBS, and no he's not the night sky guy with the weird voice , this book entertains.

And inevitably makes you feel much, much smarter for reading it. But believe me, sometimes this knowledge is a scary, scary thing! In fact, now I'd like to take some of it back.

Oh, brain atrophy! Except for a few about half way through that made my eyes start to glaze over, I found most of these essays really interesting and readable. Tyson is obviously one of those well known science professionals who is actually interested in, and good at, teaching believe it or not!

So yes, they do exist.. Way, oh way back in the dark ages when I was in college I took a series of physics classes from an astronaut named Don Lind. He was a cocky ass who said stuff like, if you ever get a chance to fly in space..

I wanted to slap him I remember telling my twelve year old sister about it, about how a prism works and why we are able to see that myriad of colors without moving our eyes look it up, it's really cool! She looked at me like I was a martian from outer space who'd just landed and interrupted an episode of Get Smart , and made fun of me for years because of it.

Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: Full Name Comment goes here. Are you sure you want to Yes No. Be the first to like this. No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. Embeds 0 No embeds. FM signals and those of broadcast television, however, have much higher frequencies and. I adapt what follows from their discussion.

Most impactors with less than about 10 megatons of energy will explode in the atmosphere and leave no trace of a crater.

The few that survive in one piece are likely to be iron-based. A to megaton blast from an iron asteroid will make a crater, while its stony equivalent will disintegrate and produce primarily air bursts. A land impact will destroy the. The gravity that wants to collapse the star is held in balance by the outward gas pressure that the fusion sustains. When the core exhausts its hydrogen, all that will be left there is a ball of helium atoms that require an even higher temperature than does hydrogen to fuse into heavier elements.

With its central engine temporarily shut. Download sample.