BLANKETS CRAIG THOMPSON EBOOK FREE DOWNLOAD

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Blankets (Collection) () FREE Comics Download on CBR CBZ Blankets is an autobiographical graphic novel by Craig Thompson. --The GuardianBlankets is the story of a young man coming of age and finding the confidence to express his creative voice. Craig Thompson's poignant graphic . Free Download ( Blankets (comics) - Wikipedia Blankets by Craig Thompson () Pdf. Book ePub - lyubimov.info Craig Thompson.


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But pick it up from the local library or borrow it from a friend. E raccontare il silenzio. Molto bello. Molto molto. Grazie Mr Thompson. Aug 12, Kelly and the Book Boar rated it liked it Shelves: Find all of my reviews at: While a 3 Star rating is most definitely a perfectly fine rating — in this case I am one of a handful amongst my friends who dared to not give 4 or 5.

I mean seriously it begins right at the cover. And for those of you who have developed Find all of my reviews at: And for those of you who have developed a love for the grown-up coloring book? You could defile the crap out of Mr.

I mean, I got it. Okay, so Blankets was not difficult to understand.

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I don't get the trend of everyone thinking their life story is something worth writing about and while Thompson did have a superbad happen, it was barely a blip on the over pages contained in this book. This dude is seriously goooooooood at the black and white. View all 13 comments. Dec 02, Paul Bryant rated it really liked it Shelves: And it was too — lurve at its ultrateen slurpiest.

Sample dialogue: This is US in the branches. Or if that seems reasonable Him: I love you, Raina… Her: OH CRAIG… So imagine my surprise when I found myself being hurled along these swirling rapids of youthful open heart surgery like a stick in a game of uncomfortably prurient Poohsticks. I believed in Craig and Raina and their awkward families. I believed in the immediate passion and the swift fizzle.

And I liked all the Christian stuff — the charm of the quaint idea of a teenage boy in the s telling himself that even kissing a girl is probably wrong.

Craig gets very detailed about some things, but remains aggravatingly vague about other things that you really wanna know about. Like the weird thing with the babysitter. Not too sure. And the ending was rushed as if someone had said Craig, you have to stop now- NOW! Aside from that, pretty great.

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Not recommended for those suffering from type 2 diabetes. View all 3 comments. Jan 18, Algernon Darth Anyan rated it really liked it Shelves: It's beautiful!

A quilt made of memories, bad and good, side by side sketches about growing up in a small town in Wisconsin; about sharing a room with a younger brother; about surviving school days with merciless bullying; about finding solace in religion; about a boy who meets a girl; about disfunctional families and people with disabilities; about being an artist and about the power of imagination, about the purity of first love reflected in the purity of snow; about losing your religion and It's beautiful!

A quilt made of memories, bad and good, side by side sketches about growing up in a small town in Wisconsin; about sharing a room with a younger brother; about surviving school days with merciless bullying; about finding solace in religion; about a boy who meets a girl; about disfunctional families and people with disabilities; about being an artist and about the power of imagination, about the purity of first love reflected in the purity of snow; about losing your religion and losing your inocence I should have had more faith in the artist and in his talent to capture emotions and existential angst in his images and in his confessional words, because this debut is just as good.

The artwork may seem naive and unsophisticated at first glance, especially if it is compared with the carefully rendered arabesques of his Arabian Tales in Habibi, but I believe this style suits the story in Blankets better: Same goes for the decision to use black and white panels - with the white empty spaces of snow and the dark corners of trauma.

The only time Thompson is really careful with his artwork is in the portrayal of his muse Raina, always beautiful and dreamy like an angel fallen among mortals.

I could detect some homage paid to Bill Waterson and some echoes of Henry Rousseau, but Craig Thompson is an authentic and powerful voice in the adult comic market, well worth a try for anybody who still belives that comics are all about superheroes in spandex.

I hope the next albums I try will be equal to the high expectations set by Craig Thompson. And I hope he will write more of these wonderful tales. Jan 28, Maciek rated it liked it Shelves: I first read about Blankets in an article on the history of graphic novels, where it was mentioned as one of the signature examples of the form - along famous works such as Art Spiegelman's Maus Interestingly, Spiegelman liked the book, and sent the author a congratulatory letter after publication.

Blankets was offered as an example of a serious and important work, which helped define the term and give it meaning and significance - by telling a mature and largely autobiographical story it help I first read about Blankets in an article on the history of graphic novels, where it was mentioned as one of the signature examples of the form - along famous works such as Art Spiegelman's Maus Interestingly, Spiegelman liked the book, and sent the author a congratulatory letter after publication.

Blankets was offered as an example of a serious and important work, which helped define the term and give it meaning and significance - by telling a mature and largely autobiographical story it helped distance the graphic novel from a stereotype of a comic book for children.

I've never read anything by Craig Thomson before, so when the opportunity presented itself I chose to take it and dove right in. I started reading Blankets in the evening of one day, and finished in the morning of the next one, taking a break only because I had to go to sleep.

Because of the nature of its form, this page book can finished in one sitting - inspired by the title; in a favorite, comfortable chair, with a big cup of warm tea or cocoa nearby, allowing the book to wrap itself around you like a warm blanket. As mentioned, Thomson's work is almost pages long ,but never feels like it because of the fluidity of his storytelling and his skills as an artist. Never does Blankets feel slow or uninspired; never does it feel boring.

Thomson managed to take his own growing up in small town, rural Wisconsin in a conservative, evangelical Christian family and make it interesting to the reader - I do not know where the book exceeds the limits of autobiography or if it does it at all , but I was engaged all the way throughout it and was simply interested in learning what will happen next.

This is a very sentimental story of personal origins, to which many of us will be able to relate in one way or another - who has never experienced confusion in a complicated world, or fallen intensely in love at a young age? The author captures these feelings very well, even though he undoubtedly looks at parts of his own youth with rose-tinted glasses and romanticizes the heck out of it - some of the situations and conversations that his protagonist have are just way too convenient and dramatic.

Still, it is a very engaging and genuinely heartwarming story where we like the protagonists and want the best for them. However, this is not a perfect book; unfortunately it has flaws, and even major ones. While it is very well written and drawn, it is not as perfect as the enthusiastic reviews made it out to be; some of its flaws are just too major and obvious to ignore.

Thomson published Blankets when he was just 28 years old; it can be argued that at this age an author simply does not have a reason to publish a memoir , unless his experience was truly unique and memoir-worthy, and a book can help analyze it in depth and provide readers with valuable lessons and insights.

The problem with Blankets lies in the fact that it does not do that - the religious aspect of the book is very skin-deep; late in the book Craig has to confront his religious beliefs as a new adult, and the matter is simply left unresolved; the entire struggle that he has experienced throughout the book is left alone and abandoned.

In fact, this is my entire problem with the book - as much as I enjoyed it, it does not say anything new or particularly insightful; stripped of its beautiful illustrations, its content simply would not hold up to close scrutiny.

This sudden ending to Craig's story was so unexpected, it literally shocked me - I wanted to know more about him as a person, and at the end I was left with the impression that I hardly knew him at all - that throughout these pages I did not get to really know him or see him develop, and as much as I enjoyed his story I felt no sadness that he was gone and that it ended. I would still recommend reading the book as it contains genuinely touching moments - mostly in the background, such as Craig's relationship with his brother and Raina's disabled siblings, which for me really shone in the book - though sadly it is not the masterpiece that it was hailed as, and I very much wished that I had been.

View all 16 comments. Mar 07, Oriana rated it liked it Shelves: So there was every reason to think I was going to fall hard for Blankets.

You probably know the story by now, since this book made Craig pretty damn famous, winning all kinds of Eisner and Harvey awards and making bestseller lists everywhere. Boy meets girl at church camp and falls in love. Raina asks Craig to paint something on her wall.

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She teaches him how to do a butterfly kiss, and he teaches her an Eskimo kiss. They make snow angels. They take long meandering walks or long meandering drives and have long meandering conversations about love and their childhoods and their families and God.

Craig is just in agony about his religious future, especially with the creeping carnal desires he has for Raina. And Jesus looms large—literally—in every aspect of the story. There is so much more raw energy and passion and pain in those relationships than there is in the central one.

It redeemed the book for me to a good degree. See what I mean? No contest. View all 21 comments. To make a map of my movement…no matter how temporary.

Those last 3 pages, wow. High Points. Church camp. Under the pool table. Cubby holes. The future. First loves. And, of course, the illustrations.

It truly is wonderful. Low Points. I loved how Mr Thompson portrayed the conflict and his own personal struggles after having such an intense Christian upbringing respectfully and intelligently. He actually had a reasoning for his feelings and he portrayed them honestly and without an agenda. I feel a bit strange talking about this because obviously Blankets is a memoir and Craig is… uh, well real, but never mind.

His narration, or more appropriate, his feelings which were poured on each page, had such unflinching honesty were both parts incredibly brutal and beautiful.

Reaaaad it. Love Interest. Oh Raina, you little dreamer. Also, there are no snowball fights but there is snow frolicking. I loved how Mr Thompson used Raina illustrate how easily people can move on from things that were so amplified at a certain point in their life, almost to the extent that they gave them definition. The pictures in this section were my favourite though, so gorgeous and striking Also, Raina can make patchwork blankets. Infinite Brownie points for her.

I can think of three reasons why this could be: Combination of all three? I adored how you could tell that each page was thought about carefully, where each panel would be placed on the page, where the dialogue bubble would go.

Everything, even down to the swirls in the dream pages. Theme Tune. Sadness Scale. That is what Blankets is like. Recommended For. People who have ever struggled to figure out where they fit in with it all. People who love stunning illustrations. People who have ever believed their bedroom was the sea and their bed was a boat I actually used to pretend my floor was lava, I was a very strange kiddywink.

People who enjoy making quilts. People who refuse to stand up for mediocrity. People who would get ignored at Church Camp.

You can read this review and other exciting things on my blog here. View all 11 comments. Oct 05, Carmen rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This book is an autobiographical account of Craig's coming to terms with his faith and reconciling it with his sexuality.

Being raised in a born-again family - which is well-portrayed in this book - is not a foreign concept to me. I've spoken before about how damaging the church's messages about sexuality are.

We always think of women being oppressed, repressed, damaged, and unhappy as a result of this message, but as I wrote in my review of TAKE MY HAND, men and boys are very hurt and damaged as This book is an autobiographical account of Craig's coming to terms with his faith and reconciling it with his sexuality. As someone who loves Jesus and reads his Bible daily, Craig has developed a fear of sexuality, finely tuned by his parents, his teachers, and his church. For many, many years he is the perfect Christian boy - one who never ever masturbates because it's a sin and feels extreme guilt and shame for drawing one single picture of a naked woman.

He really and truly feels like he is "making Jesus sad" when he thinks lustful thoughts. Then he meets a girl. At Christian Camp. Her name is Raina. She is beautiful and obviously really likes Craig. Can Craig kiss Raina? Can he sleep in the same bed next to her? Can he bring himself to make love to her? Or has his religion screwed his sexuality up so badly that he's beyond repair? I really liked this book. The illustrations are pretty, which counts for a lot. The story is very relatable for anyone who has been or has dated a born-again Christian.

I thought Craig and Raina's story was touching and not surprisingly realistic. I was rooting for Craig to make peace with his sexual feelings towards Raina during the whole book, and really cheering them on as a couple.

It could have easily gone either way. There were a lot of parts of the book that made me sad, or made me think. Craig goes through frantic periods where he literally burns everything he owns that he thinks is 'sinful' or a 'temptation.

The results are almost never permanent. I was upset because some of the stuff he burns is very personal and valuable stuff that I knew he would regret burning later. Another issue that touched me was Raina's two siblings - a brother and a sister - who both have Down Syndrome. She takes care of them daily they are 25 and 19 and live with her and their parents and it is a lot of responsibility for her. She even skips school a lot of times to care for them and to care for her married older sister's infant daughter.

It's obvious that the burden of family care and 'keeping the family together' has fallen on her year-old shoulders. She struggles between wanting to be there for her family and support her family - and wanting to have her own life and time to do her own things.

I thought the book was very thoughtful and handled a lot of things tastefully and beautifully when it would have been very easy to make the book hateful or angry or vengeful. It's almost pages but it goes very fast. Jan 18, Greg rated it liked it Shelves: I remember it being on of the stories that made me want to go out and by the book.

I didn't go out and buy it though because it was just too damn expensive for me, sure the book looked nice but spending thirty bucks on a graphic novel that I'd read in an hour or so didn't seem worth it. Now I have finally read it. If I had rated Blankets as soon as I finished it I would have given it four stars.

Instead I went for a walk to go buy coffee, and thought about it on my short walk and realized that there are some big problems with the book. Coming home I decided to read other reviews of the book before writing this, something I don't usually do, but felt I'd see if other people had some of the problems I had.

Some did, and some had some really weird problems with the book, like the guy who gave it one star because it believed it was a fundamentalist Christian comic book in disguise.

I have a feeling this person didn't make it to the end of the book, or else is seeing something I didn't see in the book. The book captures the confusion of being a teenager who is out of place with his surroundings.

The main part of the story revolving around his short lived long distance relationship with a girl he meets at Church Camp is sort of on the heartbreaking side, and pushes all of the melancholy romantic buttons for me, maybe even a little unfairly.

On my walk I couldn't help thinking that I have to stop identifying with my own doomed relationships of my younger days, and not just give it stars because it allows me to wallow in past where everything good always seemed to exist too far outside of the immediate surroundings to be feasible.

Maybe if the book just stuck to doomed young love I'd be giving this a higher rating. My big problem with the book is the sexual abuse part, which sort of comes out of left field, is used as a juxtaposition between the way the main character and the love interest show responsibility towards their siblings, but is then sort of just left sitting there. Maybe if it had only been alluded to I would be able to let it be passed off, but Thompson returns to it, gives no inkling of any kind of effects the abuse had but instead it just kind of hangs over the rest of the story doing nothing after it's second appearance.

Now, if it had been a book dwelling on sexual abuse I probably would have disliked it, a part of me is tired of the survivor genre of memoirs, but I just don't understand why it is there in the story except of course that it happened, which is ok, but lots of things I'm sure happened that aren't in the story, and I'm sure lots of things happened that have turned Thompson into the person he is today that aren't in the story.

Now I'm feeling a little like a dick for attacking this point, I just think it should have been integrated into the story a little better.

I liked this book but more on my immediate feelings for it then when I think about it. I probably have more to say about it, but I'm feeling tired of working on this review.

So this is all there is. View all 8 comments. Dec 30, Trish rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Story of a Childhood , this graphic novel by Craig Thompson published in by Top Shelf is one thoughtful Americans do not want to miss. Christian evangelical notions of life on earth and what comes after are a huge part of the narrative of our nation. Even today when our population is more diverse than ever, the history of these core beliefs within our citizenry continue to affect the direction of our politics.

Teenagers instilled with these notions rarely have the intellectual wherewithal to question those received ideas. Paradoxically, perhaps because of those early teachings and the constraints of his upbringing, the author--the main character in this memoir-- has the discipline and strength to look squarely at his life, the beliefs of his parents, and think again.

This graphic novel won two Eisner Awards, three Harvey Awards, and two Ignatz Awards in and a Prix de la critique for the French edition a year later. Sometimes graphic novels get a few things right, like the artwork, or the pacing. In this case, Thompson seemed to get everything right. The growing up story is poignant and real and revealing about farm life in Wisconsin in a close-knit religious family. Craig goes to visit his girlfriend Raina who lives in the snowiest city in the contiguous United States, in the Upper Peninsula of far north Michigan We are treated to Raina's home life as well, another Christian family who struggles under enormous pressures.

Graphic novels are especially impressive because they must portray characters from an endless array of angles, and in this case, we recognize a character as he grows over a period of years. Moreover, we are feeling that character struggle with the promises and constraints of his religion and the actual manifestation of those teachings that he can see.

The graphic novel drops into lower gear here and we see the quality of the intellect behind the work.

Different mentorship probably would have produced a different result. This portion of the book is careful, allowing Craig to slip away, leaving the door to his family open, and conflict at bay. The group scenes are especially exciting; for example, he might draw a high school cafeteria with many tables of students doing all manner of shenanigans.

It is Bruegel, in ink. I especially appreciated the belly laughs he led us to near the end of the memoir when some of the church elders in his hometown warned Craig not to consider going to art school, lest it lead him to sin. Thompson has continued his remarkable success, and in Pantheon Books published Habibi, a book Thompson had begun working on in after traveling in Europe for a time.

Influenced by Arabic calligraphy and Islamic mythology, Thompson tells us "I'm playing with Islam in the same way I was playing with Christianity in Blankets. On my blog I have posted two videos of Thompson demonstrating and discussing his work. The first is short and covers his childhood and all books. The second is a 56 minute interview, with slides, of Thompson discussing Habibi.

I am completely wowed by this man, his work, and the depth and scope of his intellect. Highly recommended. Aug 17, Dave Russell rated it really liked it Shelves: Somerset Maugham, "Rain" When I was a kid one of my friends invited to go to some church event retreat thingy.

My dad, a mildly avowed, atheist wouldn't let me go. I've often wondered what he thought would have happened and what would have actually happened had I gone. Would it have been the opposite of one of those memoirs that get published with alarming frequency, about the person who suffers under the pressure of a strict religious upbringing and later discovers atheism o "Desire is sad.

Blankets (Collection) (1999-2004)

Would it have been the opposite of one of those memoirs that get published with alarming frequency, about the person who suffers under the pressure of a strict religious upbringing and later discovers atheism or at least liberalism? In my case would it have turned into the story of a person who escapes a pretty good tolerant childhood into the world of a restrictive and overbearing church? Anyway this graphic novel starts off as another retelling of that first kind of story.

It almost felt cliche to me. The only thing that held my interest was the artwork which is beautifully lively and yet subtle, throughout the book. It's during the middle part that this book earns its stars.

It's so wildly romantic and melancholy and beautiful. The Maugham quote above would be a perfect title for that part of this book. The way Craig falls so in love with Raina who loves him back, and yet it never quite satisfies him. He longs for her even when he's with her. Perhaps true desire can never be satisfied because it only exists in the future tense, never in the perfect.

Given that, I'm kind of ambivalent about the ending. Craig's attitude at the end wasn't what I was expecting, and I was left with a slight sense of being cheated. Although maybe that's because the middle part was so strong. I so identified with him, that the fact that he didn't feel what I would have felt, kind of unsettled me. View all 23 comments. Ogni cosa degenera Le impronte sulla neve tendono a scomparire sotto la nevicata, ma non vuol dire che non siano mai esistite. Jan 14, David Yoon rated it it was amazing.

It's the semi-autobiographical story that starts with Craig from his childhood, sharing a bed with his brother huddled against the cold of Wisconsin winters.

It's a bed that is both a battleground and a life raft. It mirrors his relationship growing up in the Christian faith, the child of devout parents.

Christianity is a refuge against the small-town bullies but becomes something he has to wrestle with in the throes of young love when he meets Raina. It's such a particular Western story. While It's the semi-autobiographical story that starts with Craig from his childhood, sharing a bed with his brother huddled against the cold of Wisconsin winters. While nowhere nearly as devout I recognize both the strength and the torment growing up in the faith can have.

I know that Jesus painting, I recognize the narrow confines of the church and it's almost desperate proselytization. How the raptures of faith can come up hard against the awareness of first love and how both can be utterly transporting and wildly confusing. Thompson's brush work is perfect and clear and somehow manages to evoke the nervous awe of first love, the creative impulse, Christian guilt and the raw imagination of youth.

Enfim, gostei muito e recomendo bastante. View all 4 comments. Jan 02, The Fizza rated it it was amazing Shelves: Now to say the pages just few by would not be an exaggeration. I was done with the book before we hit the Massachusetts border. But my friend, a struggling journalist living in Queens, told me that 'Blankets' was a semi-autobiographical graphi A few years ago I was lent a book called "Blankets" which I read on the 5 hour trip back from New York City on a Sunday.

But my friend, a struggling journalist living in Queens, told me that 'Blankets' was a semi-autobiographical graphic novel well worth the read. And so being a bit of a junkie when it comes to reading especially on these long trips and impressed by some of the supposed 'comic books' that I have run across in my time Mister X, From Hell, Maus, Blue Monday, etc Little did I know that before long I would be entangled in a fluid and focused work tracing the path of three of the author's closest relationships; his brother Phil, first love Raina, and Christianity.

What I found within these pages was a lonely and isolated young man groping around, trying find an identity. It was clear and yet emotional. It was a whirlwind, and yet structured.

Like thoughts, or growing up, can be. But most importantly it was honest. Craig's struggles with identity, love and religion are shown with no malice or mocking. The characters that populate "Blankets" reflect the emotional realities of Craig's world, while his art lets us move through his life with an intimacy that reminds us how it was, or can be, growing up.

We join Craig as he begin to discover the world outside his everyday life in rural Wisconsin and how his relationships sharpen his reality and thereby his identity.

Craig was born in the mid 70's into a very Christian central Wisconsin family, and the events covered here deal with the emotional shrapnel, which results from his emerging adulthood. It's a strong work, by a new talent.

In an interview for the Portland Tribune, Craig tells of his influences and goes on to tell how he drew the book on Vellum Bristol Board using a number two watercolor brush and Speedball Super Black India Ink. But it seems to me that the best part of the interview is when he bared a bit of his soul regarding his conclusions to the questions he struggled with as young man and shared with us in the pages of "Blankets" by saying, "There's a bitter cynicism, a nihilist attitude, about Art Spiegelman and Dan Clowes work.

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I think my generation is a bit sweeter, but the sweetness is not ironic; it's sincere. I just think our attitude toward some things is more optimistic. View 1 comment. Dec 22, Trina Between Chapters rated it it was amazing Shelves: Am upping my rating from 4 stars to 5 stars because this was the first book I read this year and after 12 months it still stands out to me as a powerful and lingering story despite the open ending that originally caused me to knock a star off.

Highly recommend. Beautiful artwork and touching story. Jan 12, Peter Derk rated it did not like it. Okay, I read this quite a number of years ago.

I didn't review it at all because I didn't have much good to say about it. But just recently I was asked to say a few things because this book, which has become a darling of sorts, doesn't get a lot of one-star reviews.

Like I said, it's been awhile, so I'll do my best. This came out in , so at that time I was just starting college.

I think I would be just about th Okay, I read this quite a number of years ago. I think I would be just about the ideal audience in a lot of ways. Sensitive wussy , smart thinking other people were stupid , and into comics knee-deep in college trim , this really had it all, I was led to believe. I mean, this was a time when I thought that the world's biggest problem was that there may never be another Postal Service album.

So, when presented with what I was told would be an epic tale of a young man's feelings presented in comic book format, I set up my Dell desktop to play a loop of downloaded indie emo and dove in. As an older man, an elder statesman, I'm prepared to admit that some of the strong dislike I felt for this book could have come from the fact that it was so popular. Just like every young person who becomes upset when he sees an Ashanti album climbing the charts while his favorite bands stagnate, there's something about being young that makes everyone else's bad taste a personal affront.

You like Sean Paul? Why do you hate me and everything of quality? Just to be clear, there may have been an element of that here. Because Blankets was goddamn everywhere. This was the era when big box bookstores and libraries were dipping toes in the graphic novel waters, and Blankets was one of the books you'd find absolutely everywhere. Part of the problem was that I didn't think it was all that good. Craig Thompson. Habibi Pantheon Graphic Library. Carnet de Voyage. Space Dumplins.

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