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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. Malcolm Gladwell. Introduction - The Statue That Didn't Look Right. In September of , an art dealer by the. Feb 3, His new book Blink, reveals how we can become better decision makers - in our offices, our Direct Download: lyubimov.info3. In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an.


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As of today we have 76,, eBooks for you to download for free. No annoying ads, no download limits, enjoy it and don't forget to bookmark and share the. Editorial Reviews. lyubimov.info Review. Blink is about the first two seconds of looking--the Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features $ Read with Our Free App; Audiobook. $ Free. Jul 11, Click button below to download or read this book. Description Download this ebook at: [PDF] Download Blink: The Power of.

Not in United States? Choose your country's store to see books available for purchase. In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem.

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Napoleon Hill. What the Dog Saw. Malcolm Gladwell. David and Goliath. The Tipping Point. Personality, Character, and Intelligence. Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses. Unleashing the Ideavirus. Seth Godin. The Stronghold. Thomas F. How to write a great review.

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Chi ama i libri sceglie Kobo e inMondadori. Buy the eBook Price: Choose Store. Skip this list. Ratings and Book Reviews 7 star ratings 7 reviews. Overall rating 4. Yes No Thanks for your feedback! Report as inappropriate. Very well written, very factual but never dry or boring. Prejudging is the kiss of death The truth is that improv isn't random and chaotic at all One of the most important of the rules that make improv possible, for examples is the idea of agreement, the notion that a very simple way to create a story—or humor—is to have characters accept everything that happens to them.

Good improvisors seem telepathic; everything looks pre-arranged. This is because they accept all offers made—which is something no normal person would do. Neither Masten nor Rhea believes that clever packaging allows a company to put out a bad-tasting product. The taste of the product itself matters a great deal. Their point is simply that when we put something in our mouth and in that blink of an eye decide whether it tastes good or not, we are reacting not only to the evidence from our taste buds and salivary glands but also to the evidence of our eyes and memories and imaginations, and it is foolish of company to service one dimension and ignore the other.

Emotion can also start on the face. The face is not a secondary billboard for our internal feelings. It is an equal partner in the emotional process. Silvan Tomkins one began a lecture by bellowing, "The face is like a penis! Imagine if there were a switch that all of us had, to turn off the expressions on our face at will.

If babies had that switch, we wouldn't know what they were feeling. They'd be in trouble. You could make an argument, if you wanted to, that the system evolved so that parents would be able to take care of kids. People with autism In the interviews with police officers who have been involved with shootings, these same details appear again and again: This is how the human body reacts to extreme stress, and it makes sense.

Our mind, faced with a life-threatening situation, drastically limits the range and amount of information that we have to deal with. Sound and memory and broader social understanding are sacrificed in favor of heightened awareness of the threat directly in front of us. May 29, Connie rated it really liked it Shelves: Malcolm Gladwell engagingly writes about how decisions made in a blink--snap judgments--can be very good.

A series of entertaining anecdotes and psychological studies show that first impressions can be good in some cases, especially in areas where people have experience. He also writes about experts who analyze facial expressions, and how autistic people have trouble making certain types of judgment calls.

But then he goes on to show how our unconscious mind can also be very prejudiced. Tall men Malcolm Gladwell engagingly writes about how decisions made in a blink--snap judgments--can be very good. Tall men are more likely to become CEOs than short men.

Using Warren Harding as an example, he shows that people may vote for a political candidate because they look presidential. Women are less likely to be offered positions in some orchestras unless the auditions are held with the competitors behind a screen, so they are just evaluated on their playing ability.

He also includes stories about police officers making snap judgments, and the judicial system handing out longer sentences to minorities. There were some examples that supported decisions made quickly by the subconscious level, and other examples that showed certain decisions were better when we slowed down and consciously gave things a little more thought. Experience played a big part in having good judgment making quick decisions.

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Gladwell does not get into how the brain works in making decisions. The book is interesting and entertaining, but it raises as many questions as it answers.

Aug 06, Ms. He opens with a incident at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The Museum acquired a rare statue from the Greek archaic period. To this day, the Museum maintains that the authenticity of the statue is uncertain.

Documentation, and scientific analysis had been relied on as support. However, numerous experts i Gladwell continues his exploration of counter-intuitive ideas about decision-making in BLINK! However, numerous experts including Metropolitan Museum of Art director Thomas Hoving pronounced it a fake. It was an intuitive pronouncement which presaged problems later uncovered with both the documentation and scientific analysis.

This is the first of many stories Gladwell uses to illustrate how an intuitive reaction can trump logic and analysis. Among the factors that cloud logic is something he calls the adaptive unconscious. It's an unrecognized emotional bias. In the Getty example, the officials wanted the piece to be authentic. It would have been a spectacular acquisition for a newly established museum.

This desire diverted critical scrutiny of the supporting evidence. Such an adaptation need not even be emotion based. In an explanation of priming, Gladwell cites psychological studies that illustrate the subconscious effect of pre-conditioning through word lists.

Extrapolating from these examples, one might conclude that the casual reader will be highly influenced when reviewing a book by his mood or even surroundings at the time of reading. Gladwell explores other impediments to logical thinking, logic being a type of perceptual filter. Face recognition, he points out, occurs in a completely different part of the brain, and is an integrated reaction as opposed to the kind of multi-step processing that occurs in dealing with language. Athletic and musical achievement rely on these non-verbal neural processes.

His own example cites Paul Van Ripper's success against a team backed by the Pentagon's most sophisticated computers in a war games exercise. The Pentagon team was actually hampered in their decision making by information overload. Initial reaction, Gladwell points out is not always accurate. He tries to explore this downside as well by citing studies on bias. Gladwell is an entertaining storyteller as well as an energetic researcher. He draws examples from market research, Chancellorsville in the Civil War, the assessment of heart attacks at Cook County Hospital, speed dating, fire fighting, the auditioning of professional musicians, and the Diallo Incident in the Bronx to illustrate his points.

By drawing from such a wide variety of experience, he insures the interest of a broad audience in this book. It's always fun to re-encounter characters from other books. May 30, Jenny Reading Envy rated it it was ok Shelves: I find this book to say very little in the end, at least, little that is useful or that I can apply. We make split-second judgements.

Some people more accurately than others. This does not always mean what we think it means. I guess when the subtitle of a book has the words "power" and "thinking" in it "The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" , I expect to gain something from it.

Instead I feel like the author explains all the reasons why we should not be relying on snap judgements, desp I find this book to say very little in the end, at least, little that is useful or that I can apply.

Instead I feel like the author explains all the reasons why we should not be relying on snap judgements, despite the fact that some of the time, they are right. I don't find "some" to be very useful. If a person can't rely on first impressions, or what the author refers to as "thin slice" representations of performance or taste, what good is there in talking about it at all? Then I started thinking about why I read this book in the first place.

When the new president of the university where I work started, he talked extensively about Malcolm Gladwell. He referenced this book as well as Outliers. I felt like if I read them, I would understand where he was coming from, and some of the changes he has been making. I have to admit that knowing how much of a decision people make in that first moment could have an impact on how a place is marketed.

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Even if first impressions don't necessarily become our opinions later on, they still have the power to make a decision in a person's mind, for better or for worse.

Still, I'm not sure how you can make that work for you. I'd rather be Coke. Can you manufacture enough of a Pepsi experience and then also be Coke?

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That sounds dangerous to me, because I'm not sure you can be both. We need to accept our ignorance and say 'I don't know' more often. It seems to me that the bigger trick is understanding when and how you are doing this to begin with.

Write me a book about how to do that, Mr. Dec 06, Snezan rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This work is worth a read, if not more than one. I hesitate to say too much, since I believe the conclusions it reaches are explored in the very beginning and will immediately inform the reader of its relevance. I don't know why that came out so long winded, the reader will find out how interested they are by the first or second chapter.

I found the book fascinating for its close look into social interactions, particularly between two people, and for explaining why i sometimes I think the way tha This work is worth a read, if not more than one. I found the book fascinating for its close look into social interactions, particularly between two people, and for explaining why i sometimes I think the way that I do.

The intuitive process of understanding is one that has made a lot of sense to me, and I am glad this book takes a microscope to that underpinning of society's operation.

The examples in the book are relevant, timely and buttress the argument well. Especially the story about the psychologist that has a 90 percent success rate of whether a relationship would last past 7 years. The author's decision to skip a little exposition on detractors from the intuitive system of problem solving was a little disappointing, although I do understand that Blink is not, nor pretends to be a scholarly work.

Instead it purports to be a lighthouse for a part of our decision-making that is often ignored in society and stays hidden from our conscious understanding. We often don't know why we like or dislike someone the way we do, and yet we allow that judgment to affect our interaction extremely or waffle endlessly over trying to deny or prove our first impression.

How many times do you remember saying " really wanted to like that," that being a dress or a person or a book and how much time has it wasted. Or why it sometimes take only a moment for a person to decide whether or not an idea has merit. Gladwell explores those snap judgments in details, and writes in a readable, approachable way. He is not afraid to tackle some controversial topics.

A must read - really interesting stories about how people process things unconsciously. I firmly believe looks matter - hey after all I do live in CA where we have the Governator A really great study on how important the first few seconds of anything can be, in any particular situation.

Be it that you're an art expert who instantly knows an object is fake, or a police man who thinks that the victim is pulling a gun out of their pocket rather than a wallet, it's very clear that human beings do have this constant auto-pilot running, an unconscious "survival mode" that gives us most of the clues we might need in the "blink" of an eye, and sometimes those clues might be wron A really great study on how important the first few seconds of anything can be, in any particular situation.

Be it that you're an art expert who instantly knows an object is fake, or a police man who thinks that the victim is pulling a gun out of their pocket rather than a wallet, it's very clear that human beings do have this constant auto-pilot running, an unconscious "survival mode" that gives us most of the clues we might need in the "blink" of an eye, and sometimes those clues might be wrong.

Jul 19, Greg rated it it was ok Shelves: I was really expecting more from this book. I've heard mostly good things about Gladwell, and he had a pretty interesting TED talk, and I enjoy almost anything to do with the brain, so The book certainly brought up a lot of interesting ideas and did a good job of discussing the different elements that go into the snap decisions that we make every day.

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And it's probably worth a read for many of the stories and experiments related. But for the most part this book really failed to impress I was really expecting more from this book. But for the most part this book really failed to impress. More than that though, it failed at being a coherent analysis of what goes on in the human brain when we make snap judgments.

Gladwell alternates between telling us to trust and accept this "mysterious phenomena" that allows us to make these unconscious snap judgments and warning us against the use of these snap judgments. One moment he advises against the idea that we need to slowly collect data and weigh options to make the most informed opinion and provides examples where too much thinking and information leads us astray, and in the next moment gives us examples of how snap judgments sometimes go horribly wrong.

And he leaves us with no clear sense of how to use this new found information to make better decisions and judgments in our own lives.

Do I trust my insights because my rational brain will fool me, or do I mistrust my instincts because of the inherent bias contained within them? If Gladwell knows he sure didn't tell me.

One example of somewhere where I think he didn't analyze the situation enough was when he talked about the Wisconsin Card Sorting task pick cards from one of two decks, one deck tends towards bad and the other towards good outcomes. He focused solely on how the unconscious mind was aware of the pattern which deck was bad and which was good long before the conscious mind was aware of it when making decisions.

And this was shown by the fact that sweating occurred when choosing from the "bad" deck before the subject knew why or was even aware of it. What he fails to mention about all this is that the reason for this is because we are designed to be "risk averse". It is not because we are making brilliant snap judgments, or that our brains have "learned" the rules before we are aware of it. From an evolutionary perspective it pays off more to learn from our mistakes than learn from our victories.

Mistakes are costly. This is why bad memories are more salient than happy ones. The sweating that occurs is a physiological indicator of and means of prompting the organism to stay away. It's not even that this explanation is in contradiction to Gladwell's; it is that it IS an explanation for the phenomena Gladwell describes, one easily at Gladwells' disposal.

Two other aspects of this book stuck out as major frustrations for me: To his credit, he does attempt to demystify this somewhat later on, but not enough in my opinion. His first example is of a museum that purchased an expensive sculpture which all the data and scientists evaluated as legitimate, but which experts in the field immediately saw as a fake without being able to put into words why.

It's purposefully misleading to label this as some sort of mysterious phenomena. For instance, it's important to remember that these people were experts. An amateur would not and could not make this same snap judgment because they don't have the training to. This ability didn't magically appear, it came from learning and training and synaptic change.

These experts learned over time. They studied types of stone, and different styles, and everything else that goes into understanding their field. And this process created memories And there exists a system or systems in the brain that can make decisions based on that neuronal structure without conscious awareness.

Shortcuts so to speak. But these shortcuts are a product of that neuronal structure, which is a product of that synaptic change, which is a product of the learning the individual did over time. It's misleading to call this mysterious.

What's important, and more interesting in my opinion, is figuring out the underlying processes that allow this to happen.

He talks about autism and how autistic people can't mind read don't have theories of other minds and how this affects their interpretation of events around them and of the world in general. He compares what happens to people in stressful situations to this, that during these situations, because the fight or flight response has taken over, people have tunnel vision and can no longer "read minds" and thus make all sorts of mistakes and bad decisions because they are focusing on the wrong things.

My issue is that he, incomprehensibly, makes a literal, as opposed to metaphorical, connection with autism. He argues that during these times we become "temporarily autistic". While it's true that one aspect of our behavior becomes similar to an aspect of an autistic individuals behavior during these times, it seems like a pretty ridiculous statement to make as a broad generalization.

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He spends quite a bit of time talking about this and I don't think it does anyone any good. In the end I think I was most disappointed by the fact that all the elements to create a good book WERE present here, and the failure is due in large part to how he puts it all together and his ability to analyze all the disparate ideas properly insert irony here.

Evolution has built into us shortcuts to react quickly to stimuli in our environment. Our experience, whether broadly cultural or personal, prunes, enhances, changes those built in shortcuts as we go through life. Some develop as unfair biases towards people of different races. Some develop as we become experts in a subject. Thus some can be trusted and some can't. Our brains can't tell the difference between fact and fiction, only between experience and non experience, and so it's important to be aware of what kind of decision making goes on under the surface and what factors are involved in those decisions so we can be more aware of whether to trust them or not.

Other factors can affect decision making, such as our emotional state due to the physiological changes that take place during those times, and this too is important to understand because it radically alters our perception during those times. The most important thing to remember is that experience translates into instinct through synaptic change, and through work and training we can increase the effectiveness of our gut reactions and snap decisions, but due to biases and our altered states during emotional situations those instincts should not always be trusted outright.

There you go Malcolm Gladwell, please feel free to use this in the next printing. No citation necessary. View all 7 comments.

Jan 06, Mohammad rated it it was ok. View 2 comments. Feb 26, Hannah rated it did not like it. Against my better judgement I gave another one of Malcolm Gladwell 's books a try. Oh, what precious reading time I wasted on this book! My feelings on this book are quite similar to how I felt about The Tipping Point: My first thought after finishing this was: There was nothing new for me here an 1 Star - Horrible book. There was nothing new for me here and that may not entirely be Gladwell's fault but nevertheless I could not enjoy this book.

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

In addition to my lack of interest in the subject matter, I cannot enjoy the author's writing style. I feel he meanders and that there are so many unfinished thoughts and ideas. It drove me crazy! By the end of the book I was frustrated and upset. I recommend this book to no one. Jan 01, Tasnim Dewan Orin rated it it was amazing Shelves: From any psychologist's point of view, this book is full of contradicting psychological facts.

Even as a general reader, I find this book says a lot of things but does not actually tell you what it actually wants to address. But I love this book for totally different reasons. Firstly, I love case studies with interesting results written by someone who can write in a way you will find the whole experience exhilarating. Secondly, this guy deserves a five star because he is making less known but th From any psychologist's point of view, this book is full of contradicting psychological facts.

Secondly, this guy deserves a five star because he is making less known but thought-provoking scientific studies to a much wider audience. Thirdly, nowhere it is mentioned in the title it is a book which teaches you how to think without thinking so it is completely understandable why it shows us both the advantages and disadvantages of snap decision making and it completely leaves to the reader to decide when to do what.

Finally, I love non-fiction which uses a lot of anecdotes to state a fact rather just directly stating the fact it wants to address. I recommend it to anyone who loves to read about interesting psychological studies. Feb 21, Rohit Enghakat rated it liked it Shelves: The book is about making decisions in the blink of an eye, to be precise. The author says that decisions which are made instantly are far more fruitful than those made with long drawn research and logical thinking.

He cites many examples which are also interesting to read. For example, the description of the Amadou Diallo incident where police officers shot an unarmed black immigrant in New York with forty-one bullets was stunning.

Equally interesting was the last e Blink is an interesting read. Equally interesting was the last example of Abbie Connant playing the trombone traditionally played by a male in the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra.

However, somehow the theory did not appeal to me. It is almost akin to relying on sixth sense, although the author tries to prove this scientifically. The book might appeal more to psychologists or psychiatrists.

Jan 11, Hirdesh rated it liked it.

Review to come. It wasn;t upto the mark as I had expected. Sep 01, Zinta rated it it was amazing. Where does it all go, after you are done experiencing the experience, thinking the thought, feeling the feeling? Nothing is ever lost. The subconscious is like a vast warehouse, limitless, in fact, and as Malcolm Gladwell illustrates in Blink, we access all that is stored in that warehouse with every blinking and waking moment.

Usually, we call this instant access - gut instinct. Or, the inner voice of wisdom. Instinct, however, is nothing magical or mysterious. It is simply our accumulated and s Where does it all go, after you are done experiencing the experience, thinking the thought, feeling the feeling? It is simply our accumulated and stored knowledge over a lifetime. If there was ever an argument for listening to those who have some serious and well-lived years under their belts, this is it.

Blink illustrates with numerous and widely varied examples how life experience, the more the better, contributes to our ability to make quick, yet sound decisions. In fact, the quicker, the better. Blink is about what the author calls "thin slicing.

Two seconds, two minutes The fascinating thing is - these snap judgments are, more often than not, precise ones. It is when we begin to over analyze and rationalize that we tend to go awry. The trick is to allow the accumulated wisdom rise up and do its magic, trust in it. Then again Gladwell never does make a concluding statement in his book, and perhaps it is up to the reader to decide do it quickly?

For all the many situations in which that moment of initial wisdom is uncannily precise, there are other times that our deeply ingrained biases muck up the clarity of that process. Gladwell cites data to illustrate how stereotypes, for instance, persist - no matter how gallant our conscious efforts to overcome them. Telling yourself you don't really think what you think simply won't work. Only exposure to experiences, or positive visualizations, will change the false ideas and images our subconscious has absorbed over time.

All of which is a strong argument for "garbage in, garbage out. The idea of what you present to your eye is what you will later project out to the world is a convincing one, as the author finds himself unable to beat the test on stereotypes when he has to react quickly. Only exposure to more positive images over time can change his test results and dislodge his prejudices.

Gladwell discusses this phenomena of instant response-true response in a manner of ways. On and on, in one fascinating example and study after another, Gladwell intrigues with his findings. And you know he's right. You know it But if the author doesn't make any overall conclusion from all of this fascinating data, then the reader is left to her own wiles.

Experience counts more than credentials. What we expose ourselves to on a regular basis molds who we are, how we view others, what choices we make and how we behave.

Biases and prejudices are far stronger than our conscious will to overcome them; we must align our environment to align our subconscious.

Our deepest self forgets nothing. All we have ever done and been and seen and observed leads to who we are today and tomorrow. All of which gives one pause. But don't pause too long. It is that initial millisecond that may matter most of all. Psychology 1 2 Feb 04, Book Review 5 1 3 Jun 06, Blink 1 1 May 18, Readers Also Enjoyed. Self Help.